miercuri, 7 martie 2018

OneDrive Space for Backups

March 6th, 2018
Using Unlimited OneDrive Space for Backups
Recently, Microsoft announced they're increasing OneDrive from 1 Terabyte, to unlimited. Unlimited as in infinity, endless, never ending, vast. You get the point. The only catch is that you have to have an Office 365 account. Considering you can get one for as little as $69.99/year , this is a phenomenal deal even if you don't use Office. If you get the 5 user edition for $99.99, you'll get unlimited space for everyone in your household. That's like 5 infinities! Kids know that the more infinities you have, the better.
The killer feature for OneDrive is that the files you store in it don't have to actually take up any space on your hard drive . After a file sits unused for some time, it can switch to an online-only mode. It will still appear to be on your computer, but it takes up zero space. For example, my OneDrive folder has 100+ GB on it, but on my laptop, it only takes up 307 MB on disk. When I try to open a file that's not actually on this computer, it will automatically pull the file down and make it available offline. It's all transparent to the user. This is a big improvement over the selective sync option in Dropbox .
Now for the bad news. On my desktop, I have a 9 TB storage array, and a 512 GB SSD. My photo collection has ballooned in size, and is now well over 200 GB. If I were to simply copy these files into my OneDrive, I would both fill up my SSD, and the files would ultimately end up online-only. I want to have quick (read: local) access to all these files.
My first thought was to use robocopy, a powerful file copy utility included with Windows. My hope was that I could maintain a backup copy in my OneDrive, and simply mirror the new photos as they were added. I tried every combination of command line parameters, but I always ran into errors from robocopy (file cannot be accessed by the system) because it wasn't designed to work with files that only appear to exist.
Then, a breakthrough. I learned that OneDrive supports WebDAV. WebDAV is a protocol that runs on HTTP and allows you to open a remote resource as a folder in Explorer. It let's you do tricks like open a SharePoint document collection in an Explorer window.
Mounting OneDrive as a Folder
First, you'll need a special ID, called a cid to make this work. It's easy to get, just go to OneDrive.com , and click Files . In the URL, grab the cid value after the equals sign.
Next, open an explorer window, navigate to your computer ("This PC"), and click "map network drive" in the ribbon.
The drive you're mapping is https://d.docs.live.net/YOUR_CID/ , be sure to enter your CID in that URL.
When prompted for a username/password, use your live ID for the username. For the password, you can use your live password if you don't have 2-factor authentication enabled. If you DO have 2-factor authentication, generate an app password here .
Congratulations, you now have OneDrive mapped as a drive on our computer. This is different than the typical OneDrive folder, because changes on this drive are reflected immediately in the cloud. 


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